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Full text of "X Collection 1978"



X Collection 
INDEX 



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Barcode Number 

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»*4/t33 





TENNESSEE VALLEY 
DEVELOPMENT 



Great Water Power Re- 
sources and Abundant 
Raw Materials Available 
in the Tennessee Basin 
Which Has Become a 
Vast Laboratory for Ex- 
perimentation in the Gov- 
ernment's Regional Plan- 
ning Program 



lion u- 



I '.III' 



1 



Power Pos*'»i 






THE JOURNAL OF 
LAND & PUBLIC UTILITY 



ECONOMICS 



NOVEMBER 
1933 



VOLUMjE IX 
NUJMBER 4 



ff?rr:?;'-i'>il 



The Tennessee Valley Project 



Bv KLLIS KIMBLE 



""*HE Tennessee River development 
is one among several projects 
• through which President Roose- 
velt hopes to terminate the present de- 
structive depression. This project has 
greater significance, however, as it has 
as its purpose the economic and social 
development of a great region under 
the guidance of the Federal Govern- 
. ment. 

The key projects of this program are 
the development of the great potential 
power and other natural resources of 
this region. In the special session just 
ended, Congress enacted a bill setting 
up the Tennessee Valley Authority, a 
corporation whose function is to con- 
trol, construct, and operate improve- 
ments on the Tennessee River and its 
tributaries which will greatly improve 
navigation on the River, bring floods 
under control, and promote the pro- 
duction of electric power. Moreover, 
it is hoped that through improved 
navigation and abundant cheap power 
industrial growth will be stimulated. 

1 \V. (i. Waldo, technologist for the Muscle Shoals 
Commission, Appendix to the Report of the Muscle 



The Authority is also authorized to use 
some of the power produced in making 
materials for commercial fertilizers which 
are so badly needed on southern and 
eastern farms. This project also calls 
for reforestation of all lands in the 
valley suitable for such purpose and 
for the determination of the proper use 
of marginal lands. 

History of Legislation Affecting the 
Development of this Region 1 



great benefits to be derived from im- 
provements on its rivers have long been 
recognized. The first official attempt 
to improve the Tennessee River was 
at the Muscle Shoals in 1824 when 
President James Monroe in his annual 
report to Congress submitted the report 
of his Secretary of War, John C.Calhoun, 
recommending a survey of Muscle Shoals 
as one of the three great works which 
he regarded as most important for im- 
provement of transportation facilities 
in the United States. As a result, a 

Shoals Commission in House hearings before the Com- 
mittee on Military Affairs. 6yth Congress, second 



NEW YORK TIMES, SUNDAY, APRIL 16, IS I 



<&.<:.<?. 




MUSCLE SHOALS .1 RIVER AT WORK 



TIIETENNESSEI 
FIRST STEP IN 









I residcm Roosevelt Ehvisioi 
Vreas in a Program That En 

■ •* ti note debuting Prert- 1 slopes. The 
i plan for t/ie ufiiuto- j Great amok 
'..'hscIs Shwili 
■ til the development of the usti if 

. 
p /it/ tin- .. 

a«on (o r n 



Bv Kl NION Mm >H \\ I 
Vlio President, Kru<»nal Planning 
elation of Ami ■ 



stvpjini 
This 

lina highlar 

contim 



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■*"■■" ••' w " 

ilng up the 
it afi.i 

the f. 

- ■ 

us of human timber 

'Testation 
• Tennessee r 
Eteclamatti 

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i good 
into '. 
i es ar 
O," Ei- 
fa »tre: 
('gins i 
with the fr 
mountain s 
servolr." > 
made rest 
I flood water 
these great 
. built 
the Tei 
. the < 
Frei. 

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X-Tfc(f?5, M $ ^■JXOwwr^ 



THE NEW YORK Tl 



TENNESSEE VALLEY BECOMES 
LABORATORY FOR THE NATION 



THE TEN?> 



The Chairman of the Authority Describes the Vast Experiment 
Under Way There, Looking to Social and Industrial Change 



A permanent program of national , (em for the valley. Along that line ! 
de v e lop me nt , based primarily on an< i i n the region around the power | 
control of water resources, is e.r-| nouge in construct | on at Norrlsi 
perlcti by President Roosevelt 



It has eschewed dogma and see* , 
"studies, experiments and demon- 1 
strations" as just that. In various '*v 



grow out o/ a preliminary 



the Authority will serve. 



inn conducted by a departmental — "" 7"?"* "... ae.ve. 

KiM at Washington. A report Ch «m'cal fertilizer, essential to 
to he made in the near future by Southern agriculture, Is oppressive 
the committee wifl lead, the Presi- in cost to the farmer; with his spe- 1 
ienl '; hex es, to the setting up of ■. cialized crops he has been placed at 
a permanent commission to foster | the mercy of national and interna- 
projects on a vast scale. One pro;- . tionnl markets. In the opportunity 
ect of the sort is already being de- ■ to utlllze , he nitrate p i arits and to 
Tenncsee Valley j construct new plantg to 1mprov<! 



and cheapen production of ferti- 
lizer, the TVA hopes to find the an- 
swer to the first problem. Solution 
of the second lies in a joint rela- 
tionship of agriculture and indus- 
try which will make the worker in- 



By ARTHl'B K. MORGAN, OI ,ne second ,„, s in a joint rela- 

(hairman Tennessee Valley tlonship of agriculture and indus- 

Authority. try which will make the worker in- 

THEN President Roosevelt I ^ pe " de " 1 °/ ,ne factor >' on the one 
/ .sent his message to Con- I"" 1 * an l° f arm commodity mar- 



/ . , . ",. „_ kets on the other, 

gress advising the crea- 

• .i.. -r„„„...„. ^° man hns worked more earnest- 
tion of the Tennessee 

., „ . . . ly to solve th s ntricate social 

Vallev Authority he was giving ex- ,.._,. T , „ . . ,, 

, , . . . problem than T)r Harcourt A. Mor- 

pression to a purpose for which he | 

. gan. second member of the board, 

has long worked. As he sees it, . 

.. As president of the 1 mversity of 

human progress lies in the direc- I" 

*\. • . Tennessee and a member of the 



periments of various sorts. It 1« J 
willing to withhold Judgment un- 
til the experiment has produced I 
results. 

Let us look at a certain rough, 
hilly county in one of the States of 
the Tennessee Valley Authority. 
There is nowhere in the county a 



sides are as steep as house roofs. 
Timbering operations of the past 
left behind a thick growth of young 
trees too small for commercial use. 
On the steep hillsides the farmer 
clears the woods and plants his 
corn. Only three to five crops can 
be raised before the heavy Winter 
rains have washed away the soil, 
leaving bare gullies down to the 
rock or clay. Then the farmer finds 
another patch and clears away the 
woods for a few more crops. 



i^^^l 




tion of intelligent management and 
de.= icn to take the place of haphaz- 



Tennessee R<mrd of Natural Re- Conditions of Poverty. 



sources he has rendered a signal so- 



aid. uncoordinated and conflicting . ' ' _ .. 

cial service to the South. To him 
efforts. ... ,.,,._ ., . . ,. . 



"The continued idleness of a great 
national investment in the Tennes- 



has fallen the management of the 
nitrate plants. 
Xew method!! for the production 



se» Valley leads me to ask the Con- of good bu , rhpan fl , rtllizcr are he . 
gress for legislation necessary to jng worlu>d ()llt p, anI are bein g 
enlist this project in the service of made fnr d, ve i„p| ng domestic 
the people," the message said. plants to supply the farmers with 

The President, In company with ; unb.igged fei tilizer. Supplementing 
Senator Norrls, had visited the Wil- ' — - 
son Dam. He had seen its turbines 
with their capacity of 260,000 horse- 
power, Kou: miles sway he had ! 



kilowatt. In a valley of hungry 1 
soil he had sensed the silent tragedy j 
of the beautifully embalmed nitrate > 
plants. 

Beyond the lake were the hillside ■ 
| pouring their silt into the : 

" 

Farmers caught in the debacle of 
our economy were ripping trees i 
from steep hillsides for the two or 
of corn they could pro- 
duce before the soil would wash ' 
away. Farmed-out land, scant of , 
ition, was dissolving away ' 
into the brooks and rivers. 

The Need of Planning. 

From the idle nitrate and idling 
power i ints to the muddy lake 
bed, the President could read the 
failure of our unplanned society. ; 

Ho .,iin: 

It is clear that the Muscle 
Shoals development is but a small 
part of the potential public use- ', 
fuln. ss of the entire Tennessee 



The people of this county live in 

great poverty. Their only cash in- 
come is from crops raised on these k t 

steep hillsides, or from public works QM 
or public relief. In the entire ■■ 
county the average total cash in- 
come for an entire farm for an ^^W 
entire year is less than $50. With- 
out adequate schooling there is ' 
much illiteracy; without adequate kill 
medical care there is much infec- 

| tious and contagious disease. The 

Land is sieariii} oeing destroyed. | 

The Tennessee Valley also has I 

regions of relatively prosperous | P>rtof t "° >«rrm Dam 

and progressive agriculture with I 

fine country' homes, and a social j n community organiza 

culture equal to that of any Amer- ' Can manage the develop 

lean agricultural district. I have operation of small w 

purposely described one of the j plants for local use, or 

most discouraging regions in order operate or manage coop< 

to illustrate the need for social and small industries. Almost 

economic planning. equipped to help young 

What can be done with such a find their way Into intei 

community? If the land were taken productive callings. Int< 

over for public forest, the present ] adjustment of callings 

population would be just about ! people is an element of 

enough to care for and harvest the : economic planning whict 

timber and to keep up the roads ; revolutionary. 

and other services. With an in- | 

come of even $500 a year from forest Hydro-Elect nc Plannin 

work and with a home garden and — ... , , .... 

, , . To illustrate in still an' 

a cottage a family would have ten . 

J the Tennessee River s- 

times as much money to spend as 

' y , more than 3.000.000 poter 
at present. i nnw „ „ ,. . . ' 




"nil, <iitu null a. lluuic tanicii .11. .. ~ .,. , .,. 

, , . To illustrate in still an' 

a cottage a family would have ten . 

J the Tennessee River s- 

times as much money to spend as mQre than 3 ^ ^ ^ 

at P resent - power. If it is develop- 

Change in Agriculture. lated unlt » there wiu l 

waste through lack of co< 

Agriculture would be limited to If the development is h 
home gardens, orchards, nut ■ integrated plan, the inv 
crons and to special crops, such as a dollar will produce 






CURREN1 



n%H 



The Tennessee Valley Idea 



By E. Francis Brown 



This is the story of a far-reaching 
experiment that seeks to bring 
new life to a beautiful country, to a 
rich country grown poor. The setting 
is the Tennessee Valley, an area four- 
fifths the size of England— one which 
sprawls across parts of seven Ameri- 
can States. And the experiment is in 
the hands of a corporation owned by 
the United States Government. This 
corporation, the Tennessee Valley Au- 
thority, is faced with the task of 
erecting almost a new civilization 
among more than 2,000,000 people— 
and that in any circumstances would 
be a man-sized job. 

In the ordinary sense of the word, 
the Tennessee Valley is not a valley 
at all; rather is it the entire water- 
shed of the Tennessee River. There 
are mountains which lift their heads 
more than a mile toward the heavens, 
land close to sea-level, rolling country 
and valleys, and innumerable streams. 
It is indeed strange that this region, 
well watered, blessed with a temper- 
ate climate, endowed with a variety 
of mineral resources, and still pos- 
sessed of great forests, should not 
be prosperous. Yet the mass of the 
population exists in poverty; that 
fact is inescapable even for the tour- 
ist who rides through the countryside 
in the late Spring, when the air is 
heavy with the odor of honeysuckle, 
when cotton and corn and tobacco are 
yet young, and the roses are blooming 
in the dooryards. 

On hillsides and in river bottoms 
are the ramshackle cabins of white 
and black, set amid unkempt fields 
that bespeak a misused, worn-out soil. 



On the road the poor whites and 
Negroes pass, some on horseback, a 
sack of meal across the horse's rump, 
for all the world as did their ances- 
tors a century ago. Lean and spare, 
clothed in nondescript attire, illiter- 
ate, ignorant of the modern world and 
its ways, these are the people whom 
William Faulkner and Erskine Cald- 
well have so unforgettably described. 
Yet the poor whites, whether in the 
mountains or the bottom lands, come 
of good stock. Under proper condi- 
tions there is no reason to believe 
that they would not be vigorous car- 
riers and creators of civilization. Why 
are they as they are ? 

The reasons are varied. Isolation 
has done its share in preventing these 
people from moving with the main 
currents of American life. A some- 
what enervating climate may have 
contributed, along with improper and 
inadequate diet. But the chief respon- 
sibility must be laid at the door of a 
pernicious social and economic system 
which has exploited the region and its 
people. 

The Tennessee Valley since its set- 
tlement has been wedded to agricul- 
ture and has lived under a colonial 
economy, producing raw materials for 
the outside world. Much has gone out 
from the Valley; little has come back. 
Nor have those who have garnered 
riches in the region been as a rule 
concerned with using their substance 
for the building of a sound economic 
structure in the land from which they 
drew their profits. Thus the Tennes- 
see Valley has shared the fate of 
colonial societies the world over. 



The Roosevelt Re 



<-Tklt^ 



T. V. A., New Deal Symbol 

The Tennessee Valley Authority was set up under »n act of Congress 
passed on May 18, 1933. According to the preamble of that act it had 
three main purposes: first, to improve the Tennessee Valley in respect 
to navigation and flood control: second, to develop the agriculture and 
industries of the valley region; and, third, to operate the government- 
owned power plant at Muscle Shoals which had been built during the I 
uar but never used. 

• T. V. A. is not an isolated Federal power project. It is but one of 
nine* major enterprises that are either under way or in contemplation. 
When the entire program has been completed, it is estimated, the power! 

i production capacity of the country will have been raised (ran) the present 
figure of 33 5 million kilowatts to 44 4 million, or roughly three times the 
national consumption of power in the year 1932 The particular impor- 
tance of T. V. A. derives irom the fart that it is the first of these project'. 
to get under way and from the fact that it is the outstanding symbol 
of the New Deal philosophy concerning the relation between the govern- 

I ment and the power industry. * 

Two quotations will help to indi- [ lne ruinou . s depreciation 
cate what that philosophy is. One; brought to the public utility security 
of them is from the Presidents ! holders of lie country. A recent 
speech at Portland, Ore., on Sep- PS |i m! ,,e p\uxa these losses at 

Member 22. 1932; the other is taken $3500.000.000. 

from the official statement of policv) 0ne rxample „. av bP , ;;i , tl t() show 
of the Tennessee Valley Authority, j how this policy works out, in prac- 

Said the President, in referring -nincc. La.st .summer the Tenne 
the several power projects planned Valley Authority sought to acquire 
by the New Deal government: ' a private company in Knoxville -the 

"Each of these will be a national Tennessee Public Service Company. 

yar ^ C k ,n* ™,h,?e r "' elU morUon Armed with the threat of the estate- 

against the public. ... 

_ . . .. . .,„ _ „ . li.'-hment of a municipal plant. Hie 

Said the statement of the T. V. A: I ,. 

■»«>. .... r I T. V. A. approached this company — 

The right of a community to own! 
and operate its own power plant is I ca "" ;ll! " <1 at Sl.,78O,0OO~wiUi an 
undeniable. The fact that action | offer of $6 000 000. The utility corn- 
by the authority might have an ad- paliv declined to sell at first, out 



verse economic effect on a privately 



T. V. A. carried the day by anan 



owned utility should be a matter for x ' ' n """ " ,t ™» ' ' » 

the serious" consideration of the '"* »>»» the P, W. A. to allot the 
board, but it should not be the de- municipality SJ 600.000 -- 1600.000 ol 
termining factor.' 1 which was an outright gift-for the 

It will be seen from the Presi- construction of its plant. It is in- 
dents statement that he regards the terestlng to note that shortly before 
T. V. A. not only as a yardstick, but that t h e state board or the P. W. A. 
as a special kind of yardstick— a had refused to lend any money to 
yardstick which can be used both as the city on the ground that the lat- ! 
a means of measuring the cost of ters credit did not justify a loan, 
power production and as a cudgel. t. V. A. has openly encouraged 
The implication is clear— and be- , an d abetted the movement for pub- 
| comes clearer on reading the T. V.\\u<. ownership, with the result that 
J A.'s own statement of policy — that I jt has now displaced private utilities 
if the private companies do not 1 fo fourteen counties and nine munic- 
meet the rates of these "yardsticks" tpalities ha Mississippi, Alabama 
they will have to face government, an d Tennessee. 
or government-sponsored, competi- Nor dues the competition of the 
tion. In effect, T. V. A. lays down T v. A. with private industry becin 
the principle that private property an( j rnc ; with the utilities t hem- 
rights will be respected, but only up solves. The blow at the bituminous 
to the point where they collide with qp^] industry is a serious one, while 
1 the New Deals concept of "the more tn e ra iiroads stand to suffer not 
abundant life." only through the competition of the] 

The chief justification of this Tennessee Valley's government-sub- 
policy of "regulation by intimida- .qdized inland waterways, but from 
tion" is, according to its advocates, j t [ ie i oss r potential coal traffic. It 
that it has in certain cases "pro- , ; s estimated that if the prospective 
duced results." Not the least of the power output of the T. V. A. plants ! 
"results" that have flowed from the { uere produced by the use of coal it 
policy thus far, however, has been] (continued on page thirteen) 



tfcf LI 



^TKftsl 



TV A Replans a Town 



By EARLE S. DRAPER 

r of Land Planning ami Housing, 

I cnnc—ec \allcv \iitlioritv 



1 i lKKI> h Wl. now in'. ii in'j • "I'M i ■'' n l>v tin hum- nl Iim al residents, and the I A A- role ha- hcen thai «il 

... \,il|i-\ \uili.iiii\. will lorm .1 lik' mi n-i'iMiii n clinical ■ nii-iili.iiii in. I in. p. II. . 1 1 1 \ i -. .1 . This dues tioi 

in ii n 'jiil. ii shore lino more id. in roil miles mean dial the \uihoritv has adopted .1 mere!) hii-»h 

.•1, -1I1 Hid coverins an area "! •"• > -quart' mil'-. I h>- and passive inlcicsl mi tin' project. Itul il doe- im .m thai 

,,| -mil .in i\lrn-i\i .id 1 nl Inn*! settled I. mil II. 1 ( inillec has nut heen .1 linn' in-li 1 1 r 1 ; • • 1 1 1 1 01 the pro- 



\n interesting exampli nl this umi-cugi- From die prolh mi-in "I 1 luiiiniiiiilx inter*"-*! 

' 1. nl iln- prnldcm 1- illn-li .1I1 'I hv iln' re- and participation ■ l> >w n In il Ilitudinoii- negotiation* 

|' th ! 1 1 , ■ . .: 1 11 \ \ ill. . I . im.. v. hi. 1 1 Ii.'- ..11 lii tin' final adjustment and ham id' private 

i| id, ii'.i in («■ Il led h\ tin new \orris and cotmuimilv. inlcrcsls. iln ( arvvillc I nnimitlee has 

1 ., 1 ., died .ill iliii.i 111i1i.nl- Willi the 1 pi'' nl the 

1 v il !■• 1- .in mini' m 1 n .i .it' 1 1 \ 1II.1 1 population miinily. ^m Ii things .1- acquit iuj; 1 ijlii- "I wa\ I "i new 

I. lull people. most nl win. in lepeudenl "ii ii.nl-. the readjustment nl piopcrh lines, agreements as 

1,, 1 1 minim: feu livelihood. lie villagi contains to new school or church -ile- and -o on I cnur-e more 

mil j;; -tores, eh. I'i.i-iI 1 >n the normal high il> adjusted hv local people than through intervention 

,,| tltt- re-er\oir. ahoul - nn acre- u| the town h\ ..ni-i<|i 1 -. 

xled. involv'm<! ihe -il'-- "I '<" houses and '5 . .. . ., .. . 

. \ll M»llll!> I'ohcic- to >CC(I- 

i.ii: .1 I. ,1-1- ..I maMiuum long-time II I crests. 

it U .|- |,, im, I to l,r advi-aldi to remove an adili In ordei lo cxploic .ill the po— ihililies. earlv 1 onsiclera- 

- . mil ,1 'J-rooni In i- k -1 ho.il hiiiMin; I was given to the po-silde removal ..I the eutiti town 

. 1 icplauuiu nl < irvville iln Vuthoiitv made no and il- relniilding < l-< vn In 1 • . Studies and siuvovs hv lie 

1 dictate means 01 method-. 1'ia'tual condition- Divi-'nm id Land I'lanninp and Housin the liwlu-lrial 

cut of the people who were iffeeted Division, and the Social md Kconomii l> 

dl tin approach to the proldem. f'.uipha-i- through- that Carjville is not a stranded community. I'm instance 

,,,i 1, ivn, ili.ii ihe project is a direct re-pon-ihilitv it was estimated that the adjacent coal reserves are -mIIh ienl 

.1 |||,. , .,11111 mint \ '•" permit l |Mi years' working .il the present rati nl output. 

thi 1 n wille Committee i- ((imposed cxdusivelv \l-o. il was e-tinialed 1h.1i the expen-e ol eommunilv re 



-11 ve- .Mr -llllli 



■\lien-e nl 







OH FARMS CHARGED 

..o SS es Say Utility Agents 
*. e d to Dissuade Country 
t . From Taking Power 



pcE5 S 'SUBSIDY' ALLEGED 



Lflrtt* Company Put Its 

■ , ■ sing in Chattanooga 
p. • Opposing City Power 



Tenn , Anu. 25 

p M onal i im ii 

'■ '-■ ■ iru! up 
i hear* 

. 

I 
lira 

and 
' lilt. 
■1 also he .: ! 

'.ii ta: 
Powai 
" 'd 

r\'A 



I lys 



ri 

■ 
■ 
i 

- 

MM TenHmonj Planned] 

ixpictid 

• | Sin tOl rl gt 
- 
ii E Ma 

ro- 



i •■ > = asked ' ir i>n- 

I vii 
:, d ad' •■: tlalng in 
v». a vlgoroui 
ilic powir, nr.d 

■ v< r/, p ,-S? 

New* 

heavj 

h h op 

plan. 

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20TH CENTURY FUND 
iN UTILITY STUDY 

Power Industry's Relation to 
• to Be Weighed 
. Special Committee 

HASIS ON CHANGES 

* Regulation Also to Be 
;sed in Report — Croup 
by J H.Scnttergood 



nd sn- 
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Bp- 

f the Fed- 

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TVA 



Mammoth 




a Postwar Pattern? 




iitrof project fUggertfl means to 



mrnenl all over 



load Control P?an Also Provides Powe r, \a\ igation 



hole World Eyes Giant U. S. River Project 



Ity \fary Sp&tgo Itional possibilities of this area after 

Us America, out of Hie ( | P pih S | 'he war arc endless.'' 
a big, economic depression' In Decatur, Ala., cargo cruisers 
its mammoth war needs, rie-, wni< ' n *'" scc Pacific service are 
■ peil i pattern to guide the rising up on the rejuvenated Ten- 
Id in the postwar reconstruc- nessee, J 100 miles from the sea. 

' "* ys "' rew *- i Waters Under Control 

lanv distinguished observers! 

n other nation, whs have found EntlHtaUwt* spoke of TA'A s flood 
c even in I he midst of this ™ntrol. a desperately needed move 
bal wir, "i view the achieve- '" lnis ""> Wr ravaged section. They 
hi, ,,f || 1( , Tennessee Valley' s P°ke of TVA'a malaria control, of 
homy believe that in TVA the rural electrification and a million 
teil States is liXtm? a torch to ant{ nno P has « of this gigantic job 
it i he pathway to new economic — an undertaking so great that 
social development all the way,***" Hollywood superlatives . . . 
m India to Brail! 'colossal . . . stupendous^. . . seem 

o numerous are the represent- paJp " nA «»«*"«"* 
* of China. Imti.. Poland* Bea4- atotJW* *• des 'S n whic " ls 



mm 




SENATOR CLYDE M. REED, KANSAS, INSPECTS TVA MAP 

David E. Lihenthal, chairman, points out new dam 



Sweden, Russia. France. Eng- '""'a'mg a new world in this lovely | power in enormous quantities. Be-jtourists. Rafts and diving boards 
<i and South America who have and 'once-neglected valley is soicause of the integrated systemlalso are provided. Little yacht 
ten a path down into the beau- sim P^ a "d logical that, once it isj more power is developed from basins were dotted with small cralt 
. , ,. _ ™ . wn ,i,-.,i „,,, ih« „,„..,.» ., ii,,i ii these dams than would be possible when Senator Itccd and his group 




1 E N N . -fT 



S - ' W1ISON 

«TtAMPl»M 




WHEUER GUNTERSV 






the Tennessee that . woiked out. the 



.were they all separated. The same visited the valley. 



707 ?5V 2?5 

PROFILE C 



IE TENNESSEE RIVER AND ITS TRIBCT 

work as a unit to control floods and, at th 
•ssee itself and there will be 13 others on tri 
sy Chattanooga (top right) where a central 
; or released almost at the touch of a butt 
i above sea level. This illustrates another gr< 
feet from Paducah, Ky., to Knoxville, Tenn.. 
work as the building of cargo vessels 11C 



rer to finer group of public servants in deli 

• »ys- government" In all his experience recr 

as a railway mail clerk, Governor wou 

of Kansas or Senator. pris 

I than | He comp ij meri i e( j Lllienthal on past 

IroaiK the " es p r it de corps" of his organl- cust 

J . in zation as well as the enthusiasiam, .„ 

5 jhonesty and ability of his person- ** 

""""W S 

f Reed said he had eome down C rci 

„ , to the Tennessee Valley to take 

., %4°I W objective look at TVA. ,g«>aid 

*lhe had found "many admirable >*"" 

'UP in.,,.: i_ -m,A». „.-„« •• « •« — *l»mi 



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„, ttTV authority 



BY 









raj 5 
Follies, $ 11^ 

Fallacies, 

and 

Falsehoods 

of 
Tennessee Valley 
Authority 

By 
Verne P. Kaub 



LI 




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f-t.uiK... ons Procurement 
Officer Madrid